Poplin Farms

albemarle, nc

Title Goes Here.

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:  sweet peppers & jalepenos, 3 kinds of eggplant, okra, garlic, potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers;  cipollini, red & yellow onions; wheat berries.

Have you made eggplant pizzas yet?  Eggplant slices topped with pizza sauce, cheese, oregano, tomatoes, pepperoni or whatever you like then broil.  Like these.

Our grass fed, grass finished Angus beef in these cuts: Ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco  short ribs, brisket, soup bones (BOGO 50% off), liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and bologna, pastrami, corned beef, hot dogs made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

OK. So the most exciting thing ever (this week) is that a customer told me about the scandalous article in Charlotte Magazine about our Farmers Market, and  Wendy found it online here, but nevermind everything else GUESS WHOSE TOMATOES are on 2 pages.  Yep that’s right (doing my centerfold tomatoes dance).

Back to business:

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It won’t be long before these chestnuts will be ready for roasting on an open fire! Sooo…..just leaving them outside while you seek shelter. Last year I had them at market second week of September.

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WOW! Hello millet cover crop! If I knew you could drown out spiny pigweed like a BOSS my life would be so much different right now. Planted August 2, three weeks later it’s over 2′ high. Shazaaaam. That 5′ high pigweed you see in the distance is in the sweet potatoes.

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Last weekend Shane weaned last year’s babies – these guys, born Octoberish.  I had the dogs when I went by on the Gator so they all ran over to see (strangely obsessed with the dogs) and I got some pics. When I left they all ran back to the trees, kicking up their heels with tails in the air.

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Can’t really tell they’re running here but it was super cute watching.

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I know I already showed you this but it’s the coolest thing I’ve done all year. Hibiscus roselles for tea. One of our customers is from Jamaica where it grows, and she said to take out the seed pod before drying or making tea so this is the roselles and the seed pods which are slimy like okra seeds. I’m not sure if this is the right way to cut them out but I’m lacking any guidance here.

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The plants look just like okra too! And grow like weeds. So easy to grow. Any pods below a blossom are for harvesting and the ones above the blossom will bloom then when the flowers fall, that’s when you harvest it. Next spring I’m going to grow hibiscus plants to sell. So easy and beautiful, I’m in love with them therefore everyone else must have one too.

They say hibiscus tea is good for treating high blood pressure. I can say with 100% certainty that it lowered my blood pressure. You know how I was saying I always have dizziness in the summer from low blood pressure caused by dehydration? So a few summers ago I was making a lot of <store bought> hibiscus tea (tired of plain water) and I started getting so horribly dizzy, I couldn’t walk straight, like almost falling down dizzy. Falling sideways into walls dizzy. I thought well it’s not really organic then because I sometimes have reactions to chemical stuff. Stopped drinking the tea and the dizziness returned to the normal level. I didn’t know that it was lowering my blood pressure even more. So I haven’t tried my homegrown hibiscus tea yet, just drying all my pods – for hot tea in the winter when I’m not dehydrated.  Can’t wait!!

So if you have high blood pressure, it might work for you (it’s also super delicious tea).

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We just ran three miles then our person strong-armed us into sitting still so we are refusing to look at her.

See you guys tomorrow!!

 

 

 

 

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Ahhhhhh.

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Everyone proceed immediately to Ashe County. I’ll let you know when it’s safe to come back.

Two nights was just two nights shy of being gone long enough to be mentally prepared to come home. It’s perfect there right now, low 80’s/low60’s, low humidity and sparkly fresh breezes. Did you know that the New River is the second oldest river in the whole world?? So cool.

They still have lush, productive gardens right now with corn and tomatoes. A stark contrast to our haggard, burned-out gardens here. Speaking for my self of course.

My okra is looking good though!

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It’s over my head now. The fire ants are all over it, going up to the blossoms so when I reach in to pick it, they get in my gloves, on my neck, in my hair, up my sleeves and wherever that path takes them, while the scratchy okra leaves abrade my face like a dull razor blade. Picking okra right now is kind of like walking over hot coals really slow.

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Hi, ant frienemies! Wanna have a party in my pants?  If anyone out there has a deep-seated self loathing, I’ll let you come put your face into that okra blossom and then we can go to therapy together.

This is the first planting of okra – I stopped picking it a few weeks ago, it’s Silver Queen and red something. It’s really pretty with the huge pods, I think I’ll let them dry for decorations.  Bouquet of dead okra for your loved ones??

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:  sweet & hot peppers, 3 kinds of eggplant, okra, garlic, potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers (omg you have to make these Greek Potatoes!);  cipollini, red & yellow onions; wheat berries.

I started pulling up ginger but it’s still too small so I’m going to wait a couple weeks. Extra hot temps cause it to send up a lot of leafy shoots instead of concentrating on growing it’s roots. They say it was the 3rd hottest July on record.

Our grass fed, grass finished Angus beef in these cuts: Ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco  short ribs, brisket, soup bones (BOGO 50% off), liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and bologna, pastrami, corned beef, hot dogs made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

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Nicely tilled bed before I set out the transplants. Don’t worry, I mowed at the edges later.

Now, my food styling fail for this week.

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Since I’m sure no one has any idea what that is and probably thinking whatever recipe that is I am definitely not making it, let me just say it is super delicious and EVERYONE says so.  It’s my auntie’s Baked Eggplant, topped with ground beef (or spicy ground pork sausage or ground venison), sauteed onions & sweet peppers, marinara and goat cheese. Kind of like a casserole and it’s even more delish the next day.

Here’s what you need: a few eggplants, a jar of good marinara,  onions and several sweet peppers, garlic, 8 oz goat cheese, 1 lb ground beef, Italian seasoning, salt & pepper, a little oil. 9×13 baking dish.

Slice the eggplant about an inch thick and I peel it. (Eggplant shrinks so overlap the slices until the 9×13 dish is filled then when it’s done baking squeeze them down into one layer side by side.) Brush both sides of the slices with a little oil and sprinkle with Italian Seasoning, bake about 20 min at 400 or til soft. When it’s done, spread a little marinara on the bottom of the dish under the eggplant to keep it from sticking later.

Meanwhile brown the beef  and season with salt and pepper (I like some crushed red pepper), take it out of the pan and saute 2 onions, and a lot of sweet peppers til soft and throw in some chopped garlic near the end.  Top the eggplant with the onions/peppers/garlic then ground beef, then the rest of the marinara. Slice up 8 oz of creamy goat cheese and arrange the slices on top. Bake for 30 min at 350. Serve as is, or over pasta.  I promise, it’s so good. And almost everything in there is available at the market (conveniently also all at my table).

I took my Moo for a leisurely stroll.

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He loves going for walks.

 

See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

 

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Market Stuff for 8/13.

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:  sweet & hot peppers, 3 kinds of eggplant, okra, potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: red, cipollini, yellow onions; wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished Angus beef in these cuts: Ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco  short ribs, brisket, soup bones (BOGO 50% off), liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and bologna, pastrami, corned beef, hot dogs made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

This is the MOJO:

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Now that my veggies are kind of whittled down to storage crops and heat-loving Seventh Inning Stretchers that bridge the gap between the veggies that couldn’t take it anymore and the ones whose time has not yet come, there’s space again on our plates for beef. Specifically, Carne Asada Tacos marinated in an “amazing” (Shane’s word) mojo marinade, piled onto homemade tortillas with grilled sweet peppers & onions, fresh jalepeno slices, creamy guac and store bought lettuce (sad face). Gah so good. Mojo makes all the difference.

I tried taking photos of our scrumptious tacos but mine just appeared to be a head of chopped lettuce and Shane’s was a total mountain of meat so there you have the best I could do. My food styling sucks. I should take a class. If I cared more. The Mojo marinade:

The juice of 2 limes and an orange. 4 cloves of garlic minced. 2 Tb white wine vinegar, good handful of cilantro chopped, a whole jalepeno including seeds, very finely chopped and some oil, the recipe calls for 1/2 c olive oil – I think that’s too much but who am I to second guess Tyler Florence? Marinate the meat for AT LEAST an hour, I can’t even wrap my brain around how much more deliciousness 3 or 5 hours would impart. My go-to for steak tacos is sirloin steak. Here’s the original recipe.

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Heirloom strawberry popcorn! Isn’t it beautiful. (again with the food named after other food…what is my hang-up!!) Last Sunday morning we decided to pick it even though it’s not quite dry.

We’ve had at least 10″ of rain in the past couple weeks. Daily downpours cause kernels to sprout inside the shuck.

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I spent 2 days shucking all of it then I put it in the greenhouse with a fan to help it dry. About half of it was no good. This is one of those crops that you grow because you like to. You don’t make any money off it, it’s way too much work to even break even but I feel like it’s such a cool thing that we can’t let it fizzle out. Lots of folks have come back and said they planted what they got from me at the market and I’m sure SOMEBODY gave some of it to friends who planted it. I know of a few. So I guess it’s maybe kind of worth it sort of. SOMEONE HAS TO GROW IT. I’ll bring it to market once it’s dry.

There was also some that popped inside the shuck while still in the field. I know how it felt.

This week it was so soppy wet that I couldn’t do the things I need to, like set out my transplants or direct seed; it’s too wet to till. I also can’t stand it when my shoes are completely soaked and squish when I walk.  NO it’s way too hot for rubber boots. In the mornings before it got too hot I worked on cleaning out the other hoop house so now it’s ready for tilling, then winter crops.

Free to good home:

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Nutty rooster. Free to…average home. Fair to middling? FREE TO TOLERABLE HOME.

Selling points: runs fast;  attractive;  doesn’t cause much trouble;  his babies are fantastic egg layers that don’t get broody. He’s slightly insecure so he is a flogger. He will flog the ever-loving ****  out of you and your family and friends which is super hilarious so his entertainment value is way up there. Once you and he come to an understanding, the danger of flogging is greatly reduced, so we can also say he’s  highly trainable.

I don’t have enough hens anymore to satisfy him and he’s wearing the feathers off their backs. They run from him in terror.

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Please save us from this lascivious rooster!

See you tomorrow :)

 

 

 

 

 

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Market Stuff August 6.

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:

A few tomatoes (very few), the most beautiful sweet peppers. So good with guacamole instead of chips. Or these mini pepper nachos! The brown ones are chocolate bells. Does it seem like I always grow foods named after other foods??  3 kinds of eggplant, okra, potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: the last of the sweet onions, red & cipollini and yellow onions; sweet potatoes; wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished Angus beef in these cuts: Ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco  short ribs, brisket, soup bones (BOGO 50% off), liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and bologna, pastrami, corned beef, hot dogs, & andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

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Using the cultipacker to pack down broadcasted cover crop.

This week we did a lot of getting rid of summer stuff that was played out, cleaning up fields, tilling and putting down foxtail millet cover crop where harvests were done. I would’ve liked to have all that done already but I needed Shane to help me and he’s been super busy. I broadcast cover crops using this Earthway spreader. It’s hard to use, I usually fall down a few times (haha Have a nice trip! See ya next fall! The voices in my head.) because it’s apparently built for a race of giants? I’m 5’6.5″ and I can’t get it to fit right at all. Plus trudging all over creation in freshly tilled ground with 40# strapped to your chest in this heat…beyond exhausting. I finally gave out and Shane came and helped me finish where the potatoes had been, and then a couple hours later we got 3″ of rain. Phew, good timing.

Last year I conducted scientifical experiments to see if I really need to pack down my cover crops and it turns out YES I definitely do. According to my sciencery, germination was determined to be “lots faster” and “more better” if I run over it with the cultipacker (above).

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In the hot weather our Great Pyrenees livestock and human guardian, Nikoli gets off work at 7am and doesn’t clock back in ’til around 10pm. Nevermind that there’s a red coyote the size of a German Shepherd standing in the front yard sweating the chickens and I’m screaming bloody murder for Nik to come save us all. Oh nevermind that I just fell into a trench 2 feet away and twisted my ankle and I’m rolling around on the ground gripping my leg and wailing and might be in need of being dragged to the nearest bandage. I don’t even get an ear twitch.

This is a dog that heard a strange man talking loudly at me from almost half a mile away and came all the way out there to see if I was ok.  He chases hawks out of our yard and if I stumble or trip he’s about to drag me to safety –  but not when it’s too hot! No, it’s every man for himself all summer. He sleeps in his den all day and by den I mean under the cultivating tractor. BTW those are just his drool spots he’s not laying in oil. TRUST Shane Poplin’s tractors do not leak.

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The ginger and turmeric are looking pretty good! The farmers I get my seed from say,  “OH YES well if it’s not doing well it’s either had too much water or it’s too dry, or you used too much fertilizer or not enough fertilizer.” So I always feel like it’s just kind of a crap shoot and how the hell do I know why some of the leaf tips are brown and twisted.
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See you tomorrow!

 

 

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I wish it was a little warmer.

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This heat! We’re all half dead. I’ve been hosing the horses down some evenings because they’re drenched in sweat. I’m not sure what’s wrong with this one :)

I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:

Crimson Sweet watermelons, lambkin melons, tomatoes: Brandywine, Giant Belgium, Azoychka Russian, Limmony, American Original Beefsteak and just a few others; cherry tomato mix (so pretty), 3 kinds of eggplant – you guys bought so much eggplant last week! Thank you, you’re the GREATEST!!! Sweet peppers, okra, potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: sweet, red & cipollini; the last of the squash, wah. A variety of cucumbers; sweet potatoes; wheat berries.

BOLOGNA is BACK! Sliced pastrami and sliced corned beef made at The Weeping Radish from our beef. No weird stuff.

We have these cuts: Ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco (40% off), short ribs, brisket, soup bones (BOGO 50% off), liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and bologna, pastrami, corned beef, hot dogs, & andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

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This is a photo of the mini-vegetable ratatouille I made last week that I couldn’t add to the newsletter because our internet was down again. I’m adding it now because I don’t have hardly any pictures to show you this week  :( Every time it rains the modem dies. Nothing else, just the modem!! And it was the new replacement modem we just got the day before that we waited a week for.

Anyway one recipe said fill in the gaps with tomato sauce so I just crammed tiny whole tomatoes into the gaps. It’s cute, right?

So after we smelled the burnt smell (modem) I was talking to Shane and there was no response, because I found him outside pounding the dead modem with a hammer BAHAHAHA!! Hilarious because he never does stuff like that. That’s MY thing – in fact he was using the hammer I keep in my Gator for the sole purpose of pulverizing all the things that conspire against me. Such as those plastic dispenser boxes of razor blades that you use for knives, you know where you’re supposed to get a blade out of the tiniest slit ever, and it’s completely impossible? You sit there and screw with it for a whole entire 4 seconds!  Forget it. HAMMERTIME.

Shane asked me what happened to the box of razor blades. I said a hammer fell on it six times. I hope I’m not rubbing off on him. I don’t want to live with someone like me.

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A couple weeks ago Johanna was helping me at the market, you know Johanna. She told me how she makes her eggplant dip. She makes a nut butter in the food processor (about 1/4 c) with cashews or pecans or whatever (I used Trader Joe’s Raw Mixed Nuts) and a splash of olive oil then adds roasted eggplant (I followed these instructions for roasting), a bulb of roasted garlic, a splash of soy sauce, fresh lemon juice and salt. Oh my gosh! So much better than Baba Ghanoush which I always thought was a little bitter. I added a dash of smoked paprika. So delicious, I had it for lunches & snacks with sweet pepper dippers and my fridge pickles. Maybe a few blue corn tortilla chips. I’m on my second double batch this week.

I found so many new recipes for eggplant, I guess because I’m having such massive eggplant yields this season. So I made a new board on our Pinterest page called Eggplant is Underrated, haha.  So many delicious-looking ones to try! but the Szechuan Eggplant recipe on there is one of our all time favorites.

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Pretend that’s a photograph of potatoes. We made these Crispy Salt & Vinegar Smashed Potatoes on the recommendation of my sister. She said to add the vinegar before and after baking. They were so good! but anything salty tastes like heaven right now because we’re craving electrolytes. I always get dizziness in the summer from low blood pressure caused by dehydration, so this year I’m drinking something besides water! I finally thought of that after 7 years.

Coconut water is super high in potassium and high in magnesium but according to my google search, needs to be “sodium enhanced” to properly hydrate. So I’m doing 50% water, 50% coconut water and 20% organic lemonade.  Does that equal 100%? They say you need sugar (carbs) for energy thus the lemonade. Then adding sea salt for sodium enhancement.  It goes down really easy, I can chug a liter in a minute or 2 and haven’t had dizziness at all. Or leg cramps which I already knew was a potassium deficiency. Solving problems ALL OVER the place!!!

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See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

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Delicious things for July 23.

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market tomorrow with:

Crimson Sweet watermelons, lambkin melons. Surprisingly, plenty of tomatoes in all the same kinds as last week. And A TON of eggplant, 3 varieties.

Potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: sweet, red & cipollini; zephyr and lemon squash, okra; jalepenos & bell peppers; a variety of cucumbers; sweet potatoes; wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished, Angus beef in these cuts: ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, flank, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco, short ribs, brisket, soup bones, liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and hot dogs and andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites.

I guess I didn’t FIFO the cube steak and the oso bucco, because underneath I found some that was a previous processing date. It’s 40% off until it’s gone!

Now can we talk about eggplant?? I’ve been bringing home gallons of mini fairytale eggplants from the market. What, mini eggplant isn’t trending now? Am I the only one here on Pinterest because…Roasted Tiny Eggplant with Feta and Spiced Mini Eggplant in Tomato Sauce and

“Mini” Ratatouille with Fairytale Eggplant & Cherry Tomatoes. Pureed some cherry tomatoes instead of using tomato sauce. Ate it over baked Carolas. We had leftovers so the next night I browned some hot sausage from our pigs and tossed it with the ratatouille and quinoa pasta. So good.

Those tiny plants are working hard, really cranking it out. Wait til you see the Rosa Biancas at my table tomorrow too.

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So I’ve made a lot of recipes with them, and the very best is to roast/bake them: cut in half the long way,  skin side down. I mixed coconut oil, soy sauce, hot pepper, garlic and maple syrup and poured that over them before baking. 425 for 15ish minutes, so fast that I wait to make them until Shane calls to say he’s coming home. It takes a thousand years for him to drive home from the field on the tractor, so I have time to clean up the kitchen, sort socks, wash the dog, drink 3 margaritas and ponder the mysteries of life before I have to start cooking. Just kidding I do not sort socks. Anyway they come out so sweet and creamy, it’s by far our favorite way.

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Romas are coming in now. These are Long Toms, and they’re massive. My grandma taught me an easy trick for freezing tomatoes. Just wash and freeze whole, then when you thaw them the skins just pop right off, super easy! And the seeds squeeze right out.

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Lemon squash, okra mix, salt & pepper cukes and lemon cukes, fairytale eggplant, Asian cukes and slicers.

Folks keep stopping by the okra and asking, “why is it white?” or “why is it red?”  or “why is it so fat?” I grow 4 varieties, because I like variety. Silver Queen okra is white, Burgundy okra is red, and Eagle Pass okra is short and fat. There’s also regular green.

Also lots of questions about the lemon cucumbers. They don’t taste lemony, they are very fresh tasting and never bitter. The larger ones have bigger seeds but have the best flavor in my opinion. The Asian cukes are also super delicious, very fresh and crispy. I don’t peel them, just rub off the spines. I like to slice them thinly on the mandolin and put them in jars with water and Bragg’s unpasteurized apple cider vinegar (maybe 60/40?) and lots of sea salt for fridge pickles. It’s all just so good right now.

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American Original Beefsteak. So dependable.

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Picking outside tomatoes. I haven’t grown outside tomatoes in 5 years! There’s milo on the far left, then a row of pigweed, then 4 rows of green okra, then a row of pigweed (Baha!) and 2 rows of tomatoes. Man, it’s so much cooler picking tomatoes outside. The hoop house is like the inside of a volcano.

See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

Melons!

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market tomorrow with:

Crimson sweet watermelons and small lambkin melons. Both are very sweet. Heirloom tomatoes in these varieties: Brandywine, Giant Belgium, Cherokee Purple, Limmony, Azoychka Russian, Kellogg’s Breakfast, Aunt Ruby’s German Green, Giant Green, Black Krim, Persimmon, Bloody Butcher. The only hybrid I have is American Original Beefsteak. Also a beautiful cherry tomato mix.

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Hmmmm. Perhaps someone is slightly obsessive?

Potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: sweet, red & cipollini; zephyr and lemon squash, mini fairytale eggplant  regular eggplant; okra; jalepenos; a variety of cucumbers; sweet potatoes; wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished, Angus beef in these cuts: ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, flank, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco, short ribs, brisket, soup bones, liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and hot dogs and andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites. We have marrow bones and oxtail tomorrow.

We finished taking up potatoes FINALLY and with help from Shane and David, thank you thank you thank you. It’s so hot, and wallowing around in the dirt for hours sweating buckets SUCKS. I knew I worked them too hard when David goes, “Jill you should be on that show Survivor. ” Baha! And now, I’m going to lower the price on my potatoes back to what it was 2 years ago because these are so huge that 2 potatoes is over a pound sometimes! Monstrosities. Makes for some nice baked potatoes though.

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Lambkin melon. Very sweet, slightly crispy white flesh. Super yummy. I tasted these at a Slow Food workshop and I will definitely grow them again.

The watermelons take 90-100 days but they are coming in now, same as the 65 day Lambkins. Hey I’m not complaining, it’s just…mysterious.

Fairytale mini eggplant:

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These are good caramelized, cut side down in a pan with coconut oil and balsamic, and salt.

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Dinner is served! I love having small plates of different veggies that we can share, tapas style, at the patio bar.

We picked the corn and gave it to the lambs. Watching them eat it was super funny:

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Last week, the weatherman said, all clear. LIES. Shane mowed all 40 acres of orchardgrass; it got rained on 4 times. That would have been a lot of high quality square bales for horse customers but now it’s just *better than a snowball* round bales for our horses. If they’ll eat it. It lost all it’s color and smell, I can’t speak for the flavor. This week they called for rain every day. UM HELLO NO RAIN. I’m talkin’ to YOU, Keith Monday!

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I got my first batch of fall transplants started and I put them on the back of Leroy (the flatbed truck) so I could drive them into the shade until germination, then relocate as necessary. It’s really too hot to try to start them in the black plastic flats in full sun.

Anyway they germinated, and I was getting in the truck this morning to move it to the sun and both dogs jumped onto the back right into my flats of plants. BAD BAD DOGS! They aren’t allowed to get up there without being invited, but you know how that can go. Then I was super crabby about it all morning and finally decided it would be best to eat my emotions in the form of blackberry muffins. Double the blackberries, double the vanilla. My own whole wheat flour. Oh my GAAAAAAH. I thought that with double berries they would be a juicy, gooey mess which was perfect, cuz I was gonna slather it in butter and FACE PLANT all into it. Turned out to make nice muffins which I ate with a fork like a civilized human. Twelve. I ate 12 muffins. And I felt much much better.

See you tomorrow!

 

Even more tomatoes.

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Kellogg’s Breakfast tomato has a sweet, fruity, pineappley flavor when it’s perfectly ripe. Honeybee was digging it! I put her on a tomato blossom and she flew straight back to the tomato :)

I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market tomorrow with:

Heirloom tomatoes in these varieties: Brandywine, Giant Belgium, Cherokee Purple, Limmony, Azoychka Russian, Kellogg’s Breakfast, Aunt Ruby’s German Green, Giant Green, Black Krim, Persimmon, Bloody Butcher. The only hybrid I have is American Original Beefsteak.

Potatoes: German Butterball, Peppermint, Huckleberry Gold, Carola bakers; onions: sweet, red & cipollini; zephyr and lemon squash, mini fairytale eggplant; okra; a variety of cucumbers; flathead and red cabbage; sweet potatoes; wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished, Angus beef in these cuts: ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, flank, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco, short ribs, brisket, soup bones, liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and hot dogs and andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites. We have marrow bones and oxtail tomorrow.

Bags of soup bones are still BOGO 50% off.

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I just finished picking this row. The tomato plants are already to the top of the 8′ t-posts. They will fold over and grow all the way back to the ground. Some experts might say I let them have too much foliage and I should prune them. But some experts might not have seen these:

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and those:

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and that!

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Gotta be at least a pound and a half.

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Stinkbug damage on the second crop of sweet corn.  They stick their needle nose right through the husk into the kernels and suck all the goodness out. Kind of like what farming is doing to me.

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That’s poor pollination, from drought conditions during pollination. It also had a potassium deficiency which was probably also caused by drought, but I totally intended on trying to correct it with kelp meal and never got to it. And then there was this-

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Coon attack!

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Josie says there’s nothing wrong with that corn!

 

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I can’t believe I forgot about the MAPLE ROASTED TOMATOES recipe! Use small tomatoes like Bloody Butchers or cherries, slice in half, place cut side up on baking sheet and drizzle with equal amounts of olive oil or coconut oil and pure maple syrup. Roast at 250 for 4 hours. I think last year I started cranking the temp up to speed it up but can’t remember. I didn’t get a shot of them all roasty and caramelized because it was too dark in our house to get an appetizing picture by the time they were done. I had them with fresh mozzarella. You won’t believe how delicious these are.

See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

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So many tomatoes.

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Fourth of July parties are going to be pretty delicious.

I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market tomorrow until 1pm with:

Heirloom tomatoes! In these varieties: Brandywine, Giant Belgium, Cherokee Purple, Limmony, Azoychka Russian, Kellogg’s Breakfast, Aunt Ruby’s German Green, Giant Green, Black Krim, Persimmon, Bloody Butcher. The only hybrid I have is American Original Beefsteak.

The yellow tomatoes are so delicious paired with the homemade smoked mozzarella from Uno Alla Volta (building C).

AND for the most life-changing, to-die-for tomato sandwich you absolutely MUST have the soft crust sourdough from Duke’s Bread (bldg B) and either a Brandywine or Giant Belgium tomato. And you must slice the tomato thicker than you slice the bread. Very important.

I also have cabbages-red, Dutch flathead and small savoy; the last haul of cauliflower, cipollini onions, red and sweet onions, okra, mini cukes, slicers, Asian cukes AND lemon cukes are coming in now. Lemon and zephyr squash, fairytale eggplant, 4 kinds of potatoes, sweet potatoes, wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished, Angus beef in these cuts: whole ribeye and strip loins, ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, flank, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco, short ribs, brisket, soup bones, liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and hot dogs and andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites. We have marrow bones and oxtail tomorrow.

Soup bones are still BOGO 50% off.

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I have 12 gallons of Bloody Butchers for tomorrow. Now that big tomatoes are coming in, I doubt I can sell all 12, so let me offer you a gander at this super easy and yummy roasted tomato salsa I made with them. Under the broiler for like 10 minutes, then into the food processor for a few seconds. Also freezable! Just think of those dreary winter days filled with endless bunches of kale and turnips….WE HAVE SALSA IN THE FREEZER!  IT’S A FIESTA! Already have 3 batches in the freezer. I grew some blah tomatoes this year, I think they’re called Zarnitsa but should have been named Mr. BLAND-O Dies a Slow Tasteless Death. I’ll be turning all of those into roasty spicy salsa.

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It’s just an onion, 1 or 2 jalepenos, garlic cloves and then I fit as many halved Bloody Butchers as I could onto the baking sheet. Broil til the tomato skins are blackened, then into the food processor with lime, salt and cilantro.  Here’s the recipe. (I liked it better without the cumin.)

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We put up 10 dozen ear of sweet corn. I am super happy with the corn this year even though I got the crazy-eye from a few customers. Pappy is enjoying the shucks and isn’t he cute with his sleek summer coat.

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Lacewing eggs on a tomato leaf :) We like lacewings.

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Fire ants are systematically destroying the eggplant crop, one by one. They tunnel right up the stem and through the branches. *INSERT PROFANITY HERE*

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This is so cool and so exciting! These are hibiscus roselles, for tea. I grew hibiscus plants from seed this spring and I never thought it would actually make roselles. Winning!

See you tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Market Stuff for June 25.

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I’ll be at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market tomorrow until 1 with:

sweet corn! Only 60 dozen ears, because organic corn can get wormy and not everyone is game. They’re just in the tip usually, so chopping about 1-2 inches off the tips takes care of it.

I have lots of tomatoes: Bloody Butcher, Sungold, Brandywine, Cherokee Purple, Giant Belgium, Azoychka Russian, Limmony, Kellogg’s Breakfast, Persimmon and more. 4 kinds of potatoes: German Butterball, Carola, peppermint and Huckleberry Gold; okra, 3 kinds of onions: sweet, red and cipollini; cauliflower and a couple cabbages. Cucumbers: minis, Asian and slicers. Lemon squash, kale, garlic, sweet potatoes, wheat berries.

Our grass fed, grass finished, Angus beef in these cuts: whole ribeye and strip loins, ribeyes, NY strips, filets, sirloins, flank, skirt, flat irons,  ground beef, stew beef, philly steak, cube steak, oso bucco, short ribs, brisket, soup bones, liver, sirloin tip roasts, eye of round and bone-in chuck roasts, and hot dogs and andouille sausage made from 100% grass fed beef without any nitrates/nitrites. We have marrow bones and oxtail tomorrow.

Soup bones are still BOGO 50% off.

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Yum, this is so delicious. Raw corn, red onion, cherry tomatoes, avocado – lots of salt and pepper, and smoked paprika.

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Cherokee Purples

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NOT FRIENDS. tomato hornworm.

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Ahhhhh.

Just got back from girl’s vacay late Tuesday night. Wendy’s honey got us a serious hook-up with a free room and most of our food. Who can say no to that?? We went on 2 sailing excursions! So fun. So beautiful. So peaceful.

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We ate some amazing food in Charleston and Folly but it’s not too hard coming home to this amazing food either.

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So hungry. Starving. I had to go to town earlier and I was so famished I ate 16 curiously strong peppermint altoids on the way. Then I texted Shane on the way home and said Pleeeeeeez come home and make margaritas and steak tacos with grilled cipollini onions and guacamole and homemade salsa and use the Bloody Butchers for it and the spicy red onions!!!!!

He’s been hauling straw bales out of the fields for DAYS but when I got home he was already in the kitchen. He makes the best guac but his margaritas are like POWZA!! way too strong for someone who can’t hold their liqour, like me.

 

 

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